Dr. Trevor Campbell

WHERE ARE WE NOW?

The delivery of medical services has greatly changed in much of the developed world over the past three decades. With the massive expansion of the Internet, we have now come to a place where we are literally inundated by medical and health information of varying quality, yet most of us lack the time and expertise to access sufficient useful information that may improve our health outcomes.

“The insights in this book will live on in your head, you won’t have to drag a pain manual around with you all the time.”

Where we are at present….

The delivery of medical services has greatly changed in much of the developed world over the past three decades. With the massive expansion of the Internet, we have now come to a place where we are literally inundated by medical and health information of varying quality, yet most of us lack the time and expertise to access sufficient useful information that may improve our health outcomes. This explosion in availability of information resources coincides with a profound and increasing shortage of family or general physicians that is critical in some parts of the world.

Family physicians have always been regarded as the cornerstone of traditional medical care as well as the gatekeepers to healthcare access. This has been appropriate as these individuals have a very broad and detailed knowledge of their patients, serving as guides and facilitators, and helping patients navigate through what has become an increasingly complex system.

As populations age, health care becomes ever more costly, and hence many new models of delivery are being explored. We have seen the rise of walk- in clinics catering for episodic care by a group of physicians, the emergence of nurse practitioners, as well as health team care delivery models, and most recently, phone and Internet care delivery.

The increased costs and medical manpower shortage have resulted in ever shorter clinical consultation times, ranging from ten minutes or less in a walk-in clinic, to perhaps fifteen minutes in a more traditional family practice. As a direct consequence, chronic pain and chronic diseases have become particularly difficult to treat within such a framework, as there is a dire need for ongoing education of the patient, the acquisition of necessary skills, and the significant amount of due diligence that needs to be done.

One solution to this is the upfront education of the patient, by professional non- physician educators especially trained in chronic disease. The advantage of this is that the information may be simplified, explained and then bundled with a view to efficiency so that the necessary due diligence does not seem too punitive or overwhelming to the patient.

Chronic pain specifically is very difficult to treat in the normal modern healthcare delivery model for the above reasons. A compounding factor is that most physicians have not received much teaching regarding chronic pain; indeed many physicians state that they feel uncomfortable treating patients with chronic pain because of the above reasons.

” True recovery is built on a foundation of meaning, acceptance and expectation, in that sequence.”

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Dr. Trevor Campbell

Language of Pain

Fast forward your recovery to stop hurting

I wrote “The Language of Pain- Fast Forward Your Recovery to Stop Hurting,” specifically for those with chronic pain and their caregivers. The idea was to provide chronic patients with the necessary knowledge to enable them to make choices so that they could have a way more multimodal (using many methods) approach to chronic pain, and one that is truly bio-psychosocial. The term bio-psychosocial is often used in chronic diseases, as for treatment to be successful, it is inadequate to only address the biomedical problems alone; one also has to deal with the multiple psychological and social issues.

“Dr Campbell has written a remarkable book that helps to fill a void”

– C. HELM M.D.